The Biggest Lie About the Wall

February/17/2019 11:25AM
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The Democrats and the Media say most of the drugs coming through the southern border come through checkpoints.

The Mexican cartels run the country of Mexico. To take over a country you have to be pretty smart. The Democrats have taken over several states and it may be permanent. They aspire to take over the country. To do that they have to tell a lot of lies to a naïve public. This is just an example of one of the biggest. The truth is simple. The Democrat Party took over California via illegal immigration. They imported enough illegal voters to offset the Republican voters. They raised taxes and the Republican voters fled to other states. They don’t want the border closed and are willing to allow the flow of illegal drugs and resultant damage to continue to keep the future voters coming.

If you are selling drugs to teens in suburbs in the United States and you can import those drugs two ways which do you choose? Drive through a checkpoint and run the risk of having them confiscated or drive across at a point with no checkpoint? This question does require a modicum of common sense so some of you will fail.

If these were the quantities of drugs confiscated what were the quantities not confiscated?

The Democrats get soccer moms all teary-eyed over kids being separated from parents at the border. But, those same moms run the risk of having a son or daughter die from a drug overdose from drugs coming across the border because we have no wall. That’s the real problem. The drugs and the salesmen for the drugs driving across the unprotected border not through checkpoints.

Office of Field Operations Drug Seizures (to August 31, 2018)

FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018TD
Cocaine 45,260 39,075 41,312 38,145 52,803 62,331 47,945
Heroin 3,780 3,990 4,314 5,530 4,224 3,925 4,813
Marijuana 522,614 469,995 437,950 602,795 515,381 361,564 283,084
Methamphetamine 14,131 20,739 23,234 29,001 37,703 50,569 67,292
Fentanyl n/a n/a n/a n/a 440 1,196 ** 1,357

*weights are in pounds (lb)
** Fentanyl statistics reflected here are through July 31.  August totals will be provided next month.

 

U.S. Border Patrol Drug Seizures (to August 31, 2018)

FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018TD
Cocaine 12,161 4,696 4,554 11,220 5,473 9,346 6,423
Heroin 430 576 606 518 566 953 532
Marijuana 2,299,864 2,430,123 1,922,545 1,538,307 1,294,052 861,231 439,531
Methamphetamine 3,715 3,580 3,930 6,443 8,224 10,328 10,382
Fentanyl n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 181 332

*weights are in pounds (lb)

See the U.S. Border Patrol Nationwide Checkpoint Drug Seizures in Pounds webpage for a monthly breakdown of drug seizures at U.S. Border Patrol checkpoints.

Here’s a lesser lie. The Democrats and the media called Trump a racist when he suggested that rapists and murderers were coming across the border.

ARRESTS OF INDIVIDUALS WITH CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS OR THOSE WANTED BY LAW ENFORCEMENT

Numbers below reflect FY2016-2017 totals, FY2018TD (October 1, 2017 – August 31, 2018)

FY2016 FY2017 FY2018TD
OFFICE OF FIELD OPERATIONS
Criminal Aliens3 Encountered 14,090 10,596 10,572
NCIC4 Arrests 8,129 7,656 5,670
U.S. BORDER PATROL
Criminal Aliens3 Encountered 12,842 8,531 6,259
Criminal Aliens with Outstanding Wants or Warrants 3,697 2,675 1,547

3Criminal Aliens refers to aliens who have been convicted of crime, whether in the United States or abroad, so long as the conviction is for conduct which is deemed criminal by the United States. Criminal aliens encountered at ports of entry are inadmissible, absent extenuating circumstances, and represent a subset of total OFO inadmissibles. U.S. Border Patrol arrests of criminal aliens are a subset of total apprehensions. See U.S. Border Patrol Criminal Alien Statistics for a breakdown of criminal alien stats by type of conviction.
4NCIC (National Crime Information Center) arrests refers to the number of CBP arrests of individuals, including U.S. citizens, who are wanted by other law enforcement agencies.

Once again, these are ones who were caught. What percentage get caught? How often do you get a speeding ticket vs. how often you drive over the speed limit?

So, yes, we have criminals driving, walking, and swimming across the border. Many bringing illegals with them in the form of human trafficking.

Are drug overdoses increasing? You know the answer to that. So do you soccer moms who vote against the wall.

U.S. drug overdose deaths continue to rise; increase fueled by synthetic opioids

Press Release

Embargoed Until: Thursday, March 29, 2018, 1:00 p.m. ET
Contact: Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

An in-depth analysis of 2016 U.S. drug overdose data shows that America’s overdose epidemic is spreading geographically and increasing across demographic groups. The report, from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), appears in today’s issue of MMWR.

Drug overdoses killed 63,632 Americans in 2016. Nearly two-thirds of these deaths (66%) involved a prescription or illicit opioid. Overdose deaths increased in all categories of drugs examined for men and women, people ages 15 and older, all races and ethnicities, and across all levels of urbanization.

CDC’s new analysis confirms that recent increases in drug overdose deaths are driven by continued sharp increases in deaths involving synthetic opioids other than methadone, such as illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF).

“No area of the United States is exempt from this epidemic—we all know a friend, family member, or loved one devastated by opioids,” said CDC Principal Deputy Director Anne Schuchat, M.D. “All branches of the federal government are working together to reduce the availability of illicit drugs, prevent deaths from overdoses, treat people with substance-use disorders, and prevent people from starting using drugs in the first place.”

CDC’s analysis, based on 2015-2016 data from 31 states and Washington, D.C., showed:

  • Across demographic categories, the largest increase in opioid overdose death rates was in males between the ages of 25-44.
  • Overall drug overdose death rates increased by 21.5 percent.
    • The overdose death rate from synthetic opioids (other than methadone) more than doubled, likely driven by illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF).
    • The prescription opioid-related overdose death rate increased by 10.6 percent.
    • The heroin-related overdose death rate increased by 19.5 percent.
    • The cocaine-related overdose death rate increased by 52.4 percent.
    • The psychostimulant-related overdose death rate increased by 33.3 percent.

IMF is mixed into counterfeit opioid and benzodiazepine pills, heroin, and cocaine, likely contributing to increases in overdoses involving these other substances.

 Overdose death rates differ by state

Opioid death rates differed across the states examined in this study:

  • Death rates from overdoses involving synthetic opioids increased in 21 states, with 10 states doubling their rates from 2015 to 2016.
    • New Hampshire, West Virginia, and Massachusetts had the highest death rates from synthetic opioids.
  • Fourteen states had significant increases in death rates involving heroin, with Washington D.C., West Virginia, and Ohio having the highest rates.
  • Eight states had significant increases in death rates involving prescription opioids. West Virginia, Maryland, Maine, and Utah had the highest rates.
  • Sixteen states had significant increases in death rates involving cocaine, with Washington D.C., Rhode Island, and Ohio having the highest rates.
  • Fourteen states had significant increases in death rates involving psychostimulants; the highest death rates occurred primarily in the Midwest and Western regions.

“Effective, synchronized programs to prevent drug overdoses will require coordination of law enforcement, first responders, mental health/substance-abuse providers, public health agencies, and community partners,” said the report’s lead author, Puja Seth, Ph.D.

How to coordinate the public-health and public-safety response to overdose deaths

Today’s report highlights the continued need for public health and law enforcement to work together in preventing overdose deaths and taking action to:

    • Protect people with opioid use disorder (OUD) by expanding treatmentExternal capacity and naloxone distribution.
    • Support programs that reduce the harms of injecting opioids, including programs offering screening for HIV and hepatitis B and C in combination with referral to treatment.
    • Improve coordination among law enforcement and public-health agencies to reduce and improve detection of the illicit opioid supply.
    • Improve opioid prescribing to reduce unnecessary exposure to opioids and prevent addiction by training providers and implementing CDC’s Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.
  • Improve access to and use of prescription drug monitoring programs.

CDC’s Overdose Prevention in States initiatives include funding for state-level public health efforts in 45 states and Washington, D.C., to implement key prescription and illicit opioid surveillance and prevention activities. CDC equips states with resources to prevent opioid misuse and overdose by tracking and monitoring the epidemic, helping scale up effective programs, and equipping health care providers with tools and guidance needed to make informed clinical decisions.

CDC is also working with High Intensity Drug Trafficking AreasExternal (HIDTA) on the Heroin Response Strategy to increase uptake of community interventions that address the impact of illicit opioids. In March 2016, CDC released the Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain to provide recommendations to providers on the prescribing of opioid pain medication for patients 18 and older in primary care settings. Learn more at www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose.

CDC continues to work closely with other federal agencies to support the Department of Health and Human Services’ five-point strategy to fight the opioid overdose crisis by:

  • Improving access to prevention, treatment, and recovery services, including the full range of medication-assisted treatment.
  • Better targeting availability and distribution of overdose-reversing drugs.
  • Strengthening surveillance activities through timely public health data and reporting.
  • Supporting cutting-edge research on pain and addiction.

Advancing better practices for pain management.

###
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

In summary, the Democrat Party cares not about the 70,000 who die every year from drug overdoses from drugs leaking through the unprotected border. They consider that collateral damage. They want those voters. The Democrat Party is not better at marketing but simply have the access to free advertising from the media. So, the only message getting advertised is the Democrat message.

This is the Trump message, since many Republicans in Congress are either too stupid or detest Trump too much to care.

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